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Lucky carrot: Alberta woman finds mother-in-law's lost ring

CAMROSE, Alberta — A Canadian woman who lost her engagement ring 13 years ago while weeding her garden on the family farm is wearing it proudly again after her daughter-in-law pulled it from the ground on a misshapen carrot.

Mary Grams, 84, said she can't believe the lucky carrot actually grew through and around the diamond ring she had long given up hope of finding.

Grams said she never told her husband, Norman, that she lost the ring, but told her son. Her husband died five years ago.

"I feel relieved and happy inside," Grams said this week. "It grew into the carrot. I still can't figure it out."

Her daughter-in-law, Colleen Daley, found the ring while harvesting carrots for supper with her dog Billy at the farm near Armena, Alberta, where Grams used to live. The farm has been in the family for 105 years.

Daley said while she was pulling the carrots and noticed one of them looked strange. She almost fed it to her dog but decided to keep it and just threw it in her pail. When she was washing the carrots she noticed the ring and spoke to her husband, Grams' son, about what she had found.

They quickly called Grams. "I said we found your ring in the garden. She couldn't believe it," Daley said. "It was so weird that the carrot grew perfectly through that ring."

Grams said she was eager to try the ring on again after so many years. With family looking on she washed the ring with a little soap to get the dirt off. It slid on her finger as easily as it did when her husband gave it to her.

"We were giggling and laughing," she said. "It fit. After that many years it fits."

Lucky carrot: Alberta woman finds mother-in-law's lost ring 08/17/17 [Last modified: Thursday, August 17, 2017 1:48pm]
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