Make us your home page
Instagram

Flight delays pile up amid FAA budget cuts

A China Southern Cargo jet takes off at LAX International airport in Los Angeles Monday. Some fliers headed to Los Angeles International Airport were met with delays Sunday, the first day of staffing cuts for air traffic controllers because of government spending reductions. Budget cuts that kicked in last month forced the FAA to give controllers extra days off.

Associated Press

A China Southern Cargo jet takes off at LAX International airport in Los Angeles Monday. Some fliers headed to Los Angeles International Airport were met with delays Sunday, the first day of staffing cuts for air traffic controllers because of government spending reductions. Budget cuts that kicked in last month forced the FAA to give controllers extra days off.

Flights were delayed by up to two hours across the country Monday, the first weekday that the nation's air traffic control system operated with 10 percent fewer controllers.

Pilots, gate agents and others were quick to blame furloughs caused by mandatory across-the-board budget cuts, but the Federal Aviation Administration said it was too soon to assign blame.

The agency said in a statement, however, that "travelers can expect to see a wide range of delays that will change throughout the day depending on staffing and weather-related issues," and that there were special "staffing challenges" in New York, Dallas-Fort Worth, Los Angeles and Jacksonville. At those centers, controllers had to space airplanes farther apart so that they would not have to take on more planes than they could manage at a time. The FAA said it would not have a firm count of how many delays were the result of air traffic control staffing until today.

Delays piled up throughout Monday as the airlines, including US Airways, JetBlue and Delta, were forced to cancel some flights because of cutbacks. Shuttle flights between Washington and New York were running 60 to 90 minutes late. But Southwest Airlines said it did not see any unusual delays.

One expert on air traffic, Daniel A. Baker, a spokesman for FlightAware of Houston, said that it was always difficult to parse out what had caused delays, but that some appeared to be coming from staffing problems, and that they were in the range of 60 to 70 minutes. "It can ruin your afternoon, but it's not what people had pictured," he said, adding that many feared worse.

"We have 36 hours of experience in this situation," he said. "It's a little bit too early to tell, candidly," how much the short-staffing of air traffic control was to blame.

At airports, Monday is typically one of the busiest days, when many high-paying business travelers depart for a week on the road. The FAA's controller cuts went into effect Sunday. The full force was not felt until Monday morning.

Travel writer Tim Leffel had just boarded a US Airways plane from Charlotte, N.C., to Tampa, when the flight crew had an announcement.

"They said: 'The weather's fine, but there aren't enough air traffic controllers,' " Leffel said. Passengers were asked to head back into the terminal. "People were just kind of rolling their eyes."

His flight landed one hour and 13 minutes late.

One thing working in fliers' favor Monday was relatively good weather at most major airports.

However, the furloughs could continue through September, raising the risk of a turbulent summer travel season. And the shortage of controllers could exacerbate weather problems.

There's no way for passengers to tell in advance which airport or flights will experience delays. The FAA calculated that the furloughs would affect up to 6,700 flights a day. There are 30,000 to 35,000 commercial flights a day.

FAA officials have said they have no choice but to furlough all 47,000 agency employees — including nearly 15,000 controllers — because the agency's budget is dominated by salaries. Each employee will lose one day of work every other week. The FAA has said that planes will have to take off and land less frequently, so as not to overload the remaining controllers on duty.

Critics have said the FAA could reduce its budget in other spots that wouldn't delay travelers.

"There's a lot finger-pointing going on, but the simple truth is that it is Congress' job to fix this," said Rep. Rick Larsen, a Washington Democrat and member of the House aviation panel. "Flight delays are just the latest example of how the sequester is damaging the economy and hurting families across the country."

Some travel groups have warned that the disruptions could hurt the economy.

"If these disruptions unfold as predicted, business travelers will stay home, severely impacting not only the travel industry but the economy overall," the Global Business Travel Association warned the head of the FAA in a letter Friday.

Information from the New York Times and Associated Press was included in this report.

Why do furloughs cause delays?

NPR provides this explanation: Each furloughed employee must skip one day of work for every two-week pay period. To avoid overloading the remaining controllers, the FAA is allowing fewer departures and landings.

What happened at Tampa Bay airports?

St. Petersburg-Clearwater International Airport had no delays, but as of late Monday afternoon, Tampa International reported 46 delayed departures and 56 delayed arrivals. 6A

TSA to delay allowing small knives on planes

The Transportation Security Administration will temporarily delay a policy change that would have allowed passengers to carry small folding knives onto planes. In a letter to TSA employees, TSA chief John Pistole said he decided to maintain, at least temporarily, the ban on knives on planes after a meeting Monday with an aviation security panel. The changes were scheduled to take effect Thursday. Pisotle's letter did not say when he might reconsider easing the knife ban. TSA officials declined to comment. The changes, announced last month, would have allowed passengers to carry folding knives with blades 2.36 inches or shorter and less than half an inch wide, as well as pool cues, ski poles, hockey sticks, lacrosse sticks, golf clubs and novelty-size bats. Until further notice, the items remain banned from the cabin of commercial planes.

Los Angeles Times

Flight delays pile up amid FAA budget cuts 04/22/13 [Last modified: Monday, April 22, 2013 10:22pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Q&A: A business leader and historian jointly delve into Tampa's waterfront

    Business

    TAMPA — As a native of Tampa, Arthur Savage has always had a passion for his hometown's history. And as a third-generation owner and operator of A.R. Savage & Son, a Tampa-based shipping agency, his affinity for his hometown also extends to its local waterways.

    Arthur Savage (left) and Rodney Kite-Powell, co-authors of "Tampa Bay's Waterfront: Its History and Development," stand for a portrait with the bust of James McKay Sr. in downtown Tampa on Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017. McKay, who passed away in 1876, was a prominent businessman, among other things, in the Tampa area. He was Arthur Savage's great great grandfather. [LOREN ELLIOTT   |   Times]
  2. Tampa's connected-vehicle program looking for volunteers

    Transportation

    TAMPA — Drivers on the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway can save on their monthly toll bill by volunteering to test new technology that will warn them about potential crashes and traffic jams.

    A rendering shows how new technology available through the Tampa-Hillsborough Expressway Authority will warn driver's about crashes, traffic jams, speed decreases and more. THEA is seeking 1,600 volunteers to install the devices, which will display alerts in their review mirrors, as part of an 18-month connected-vehicle pilot.
  3. What Florida's top Republicans are saying about Donald Trump

    State Roundup

    Republicans nationwide are blasting President Donald Trump for how he responded to Charlottesville.

  4. Tampa Bay Lightning, Amalie Arena to host job fair today

    Business

    TAMPA — The Tampa Bay Lightning and its home, Amalie Arena, are hosting a part-time job fair from 3 to 6 p.m. today on the Promenade Level of the arena. Available positions include platinum services, parking attendants, event security, housekeeping, retail and many other departments.

    The Tampa Bay Lightning and AMALIE Arena is hosting a part-time job fair on Thursday, Aug. 17 on the Promenade level of the arena.
  5. Nearly 1 in 4 Tampa Bay homeowners considered equity rich

    Real Estate

    If your home is worth at least 50 percent more than you owe, you're rich — equity rich that is.

    About one in four Tampa Bay homeowners are considered "equity rich." [Associated Press file photo]