Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Prosecution rests in case of slain lottery millionaire

Defendant Dorice “DeeDee” Moore talks Friday with her defense attorney Chris Boldt during her trial in Tampa. Moore is charged with the murder of Lakeland lottery winner Abraham Shakespeare. The defense takes the floor on Monday.

Pool photo

Defendant Dorice “DeeDee” Moore talks Friday with her defense attorney Chris Boldt during her trial in Tampa. Moore is charged with the murder of Lakeland lottery winner Abraham Shakespeare. The defense takes the floor on Monday.

TAMPA — The prosecution rested its case Friday against Dorice "DeeDee" Moore, charged with first-degree murder in the death of Lakeland lottery winner Abraham Shakespeare. Testimony ended with a detective telling jurors that Moore blamed her 14-year-old son for the fatal shooting in 2009 after first claiming that two other men killed Shakespeare.

Polk County Detective Dave Clark said Moore sunk to her knees in a Sheriff's Office parking lot on Jan. 25, 2010. He quoted Moore as saying, "My son shot Abraham because he was choking me. He was only trying to protect me."

Moore, 40, is accused of killing Shakespeare, 43, and burying him in Plant City after taking over his Lakeland mansion and the remains of his 2006 Florida Lotto jackpot.

Her attorneys have not said whether she will testify when the defense begins Monday before Hillsborough Circuit Judge Emmett Battles.

Prosecution rests in case of slain lottery millionaire 12/07/12 [Last modified: Friday, December 7, 2012 10:52pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Report: Trump asked intel chiefs to push back against FBI collusion probe after Comey revealed its existence

    National

    President Donald Trump asked two of the nation's top intelligence officials in March to help him push back against an FBI investigation into possible coordination between his campaign and the Russian government, the Washington Post reports, citing current and former officials.

    From  left, CIA Director Mike Pompeo; Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats; and National Security Agency Director Adm. Michael Rogers take their seats on Capitol Hill on May 11 before  testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on major threats facing the U.S. [Associated Press]
  2. Trump asked intelligence chiefs to push back against FBI collusion probe after Comey revealed its existence

    National

    President Donald Trump asked two of the nation's top intelligence officials in March to help him push back against an FBI investigation into possible coordination between his campaign and the Russian government, current and former officials said, according to the Washington Post.

    After President Donald Trump fired James Comey, shown here, as FBI director, the Washington Post is reporting, Trump made separate appeals to the director of national intelligence, Daniel Coats, and to Adm. Michael S. Rogers, the director of the National Security Agency, urging them to publicly deny the existence of any evidence of collusion during the 2016 election.
  3. For Gov. Rick Scott, 'fighting' could mean vetoing entire state budget

    State Roundup

    Every day, Gov. Rick Scott is getting a lot of advice.

    The last time a Florida governor vetoed the education portion of the state budget was in 1983. Gov. Bob Graham blasted fellow Democrats for their “willing acceptance of mediocrity.”
  4. Romano: Time is up chief, make a call on police body cameras

    Crime

    Excuse me chief, but it's time to take a stand.

    St. Petersburg police Chief Tony Holloway
  5. Potential new laws further curb Floridians' right to government in the Sunshine

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — From temporarily shielding the identities of murder witnesses to permanently sealing millions of criminal and arrest records, state lawmakers did more this spring than they have in all but one of the past 22 years to chip away at Floridians' constitutional guarantees to access government records and …

    The Legislature passed 17 new exemptions to the Sunshine Law, according to a tally by the First Amendment Foundation.