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Florida lawmakers propose three kinds of high school diplomas

MaryEllen Elia, Hillsborough superintendent, says new graduation requirements pose a “difficult scenario.”

Edmund D. Fountain | Times

MaryEllen Elia, Hillsborough superintendent, says new graduation requirements pose a “difficult scenario.”

TALLAHASSEE — What if high school were less like an assembly line and more like a Choose Your Own Adventure novel?

State lawmakers are considering a proposal that would let students pick from three diploma designations, each with its own set of graduation requirements. One would be designed for students planning to go directly into the workforce. College-bound teenagers would have their own pathway, as would high achievers with post-graduate studies in mind.

Superintendents say the move would keep students engaged in their studies, and provide them with the technical training they need for high-demand jobs.

But another factor is helping drive the decision: This year's crop of high school freshmen are the first to face challenging new graduation requirements. Some district officials have said the standards are too tough and will prevent thousands of students from earning a high school diploma.

"We really believe it's going to be a difficult scenario for our students," Hillsborough superintendent MaryEllen Elia recently told a House education panel.

The graduation bill is the latest effort by Florida lawmakers to improve the state's secondary schools.

In 2010, the Legislature ushered in a new regime of standardized tests known as end-of-course exams. Three were designed as must-pass tests: algebra I, geometry and biology.

This year's freshmen are the first students saddled with the graduation requirement. That concerns superintendents, who point out that only 59 percent of test-takers passed the algebra I exam last year.

"Right now, you and I know that there is the potential for a bottleneck effect for graduating students," Miami-Dade superintendent Alberto Carvalho told state representatives in Tallahassee last month.

The bill under consideration in the House would give students more flexibility. They would still have to pass the algebra test to earn a diploma. But only students choosing the "scholar" designation would be required to pass the geometry and biology exams. For other students, the tests would be 30 percent of their final grade in the subject.

The proposal would also give students the freedom to take more electives. Students electing the diploma with an industry designation, for example, could take eight credits in a career-training program in lieu of the physics and chemistry courses currently required.

Lawmakers insist there will still only be one standard diploma offered in Florida. It will just come in three varieties.

Carvalho, the Miami-Dade superintendent, said the various "pathways" would help keep students engaged by connecting their studies to their interests and future plans. "One of the most critical elements that leads to dropping out is that students are not seeing contextual relevance in their learning," Carvalho said. "That needs to change."

The Senate version of the bill doesn't lay out three diploma designations. But it does enable students to count industry-certification courses toward graduation.

The two proposals have been moving swiftly through their respective chambers. Both have the support of leadership and lawmakers with expertise in education.

"The concept is a great one," said Rep. Manny Diaz Jr., a Hialeah Republican and assistant principal at Miami's George T. Baker Aviation School. "What it does is make high school relevant to careers."

There are, however, some philosophical questions that have led to bumps in the road.

Earlier this month, Patricia Levesque, executive director of the Foundation for Florida's Future, tried to dissuade a House panel from dropping geometry from the graduation requirements. She urged lawmakers not to lower the standards, saying Florida students had a track record of rising to the occasion.

Levesque also raised concerns with the diploma designations. "When you set those low bars, the students that are going to be more often counseled into that diploma are our minority and underrepresented students," she said.

Sen. Bill Montford, a Tallahassee Democrat, refuted claims that the bill would water down the curriculum. "This whole approach is not … retreating, not backing down," said Montford, who is also CEO of the Florida Association of District School Superintendents. "It's a tweaking and a better alternative for a lot of our students."

Pinellas County superintendent Michael Grego, who pitched a similar proposal earlier this year, agreed. "Right now, if you don't pass an end-of-course exam, you don't graduate," Grego said. "It shouldn't be an-all-or-nothing thing."

Monique Harris, a 17-year-old student in the automotive technology program at Northeast High in St. Petersburg, called the multiple diploma pathways "a great idea."

"A lot of students in industry programs struggle with the core classes in English and math," said Harris, who plans to study electrical engineering at the University of Central Florida. "This would be a big help."

Contact Kathleen McGrory at kmcgrory@MiamiHerald.com.

Florida lawmakers propose three kinds of high school diplomas 03/23/13 [Last modified: Saturday, March 23, 2013 8:09pm]
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