Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

For Pinellas teachers upset about evaluations, superintendent writes letter of explanation

For the many Pinellas schoolteachers who got less-than-perfect evaluations this year, superintendent Mike Grego plans to write a letter admitting the evaluation system itself was, well, less than perfect.

Grego said he is preparing the letter and it will be available to any schoolteacher who wants to put it in his or her personnel file. For teachers who suddenly got lower evaluations, the letter will explain that the complicated new state-mandated system was a work in progress,

He made his comments Tuesday at a workshop meeting of the Pinellas School Board.

This will be the second letter Grego has sent about the controversial evaluations, which set off a wave of anguish among teachers who complained that the new system was not only harsh, but hopelessly confusing.

Grego last month told educators, "It is clear that we need to revisit the teacher appraisal plan that was submitted by our district to the state over a year ago." He also said that if it proves necessary, "We should work together with our legislators to adjust the statute."

Grego said school and teachers union officials are continuing to look at the new system and work on proposed changes. But in the meantime, he wanted teachers and administrators to have this letter, which might shed light on those with sudden drops in their evaluation grades.

School Board members generally supported Grego's approach. Board Chairwoman Robin Wikle said with all the questions surrounding the new system, it makes sense to more or less take "a mulligan."

Board member Linda Lerner wanted more. She said she visited a well-regarded school where she was told three-fourths of the teachers will be given a "needs improvement" rating.

"When you are a highly effective teacher or very effective teacher and you get 'needs improvement,' this is serious," she said.

She said she didn't want Grego to sugarcoat his message by making it sound like the new system just needs a little touching up. She called it "the first year of a very flawed instrument."

Lerner suggested the School Board further refine the wording of the letter for teachers, but others on the board disagreed.

For Pinellas teachers upset about evaluations, superintendent writes letter of explanation 11/13/12 [Last modified: Wednesday, November 14, 2012 12:03am]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Report: Trump asked intel chiefs to push back against FBI collusion probe after Comey revealed its existence

    National

    President Donald Trump asked two of the nation's top intelligence officials in March to help him push back against an FBI investigation into possible coordination between his campaign and the Russian government, the Washington Post reports, citing current and former officials.

    From  left, CIA Director Mike Pompeo; Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats; and National Security Agency Director Adm. Michael Rogers take their seats on Capitol Hill on May 11 before  testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on major threats facing the U.S. [Associated Press]
  2. Trump asked intelligence chiefs to push back against FBI collusion probe after Comey revealed its existence

    National

    President Donald Trump asked two of the nation's top intelligence officials in March to help him push back against an FBI investigation into possible coordination between his campaign and the Russian government, current and former officials said, according to the Washington Post.

    After President Donald Trump fired James Comey, shown here, as FBI director, the Washington Post is reporting, Trump made separate appeals to the director of national intelligence, Daniel Coats, and to Adm. Michael S. Rogers, the director of the National Security Agency, urging them to publicly deny the existence of any evidence of collusion during the 2016 election.
  3. For Gov. Rick Scott, 'fighting' could mean vetoing entire state budget

    State Roundup

    Every day, Gov. Rick Scott is getting a lot of advice.

    The last time a Florida governor vetoed the education portion of the state budget was in 1983. Gov. Bob Graham blasted fellow Democrats for their “willing acceptance of mediocrity.”
  4. Romano: Time is up chief, make a call on police body cameras

    Crime

    Excuse me chief, but it's time to take a stand.

    St. Petersburg police Chief Tony Holloway
  5. Potential new laws further curb Floridians' right to government in the Sunshine

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — From temporarily shielding the identities of murder witnesses to permanently sealing millions of criminal and arrest records, state lawmakers did more this spring than they have in all but one of the past 22 years to chip away at Floridians' constitutional guarantees to access government records and …

    The Legislature passed 17 new exemptions to the Sunshine Law, according to a tally by the First Amendment Foundation.