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12-foot alligator catch follows an 11-footer caught the night before

Catching an 11-foot alligator might be considered a once-in-a-lifetime achievement, but four Florida Panhandle men who did that Wednesday turned around an captured a 12-foot gator the next night.

Late Thursday, Nick Naylor, John Booker, Kenny Way and Casey Shields caught a 12-foot, 6-inch alligator in Blackwater Bay, east of Pensacola. Using a fishing rod, it took the men about two hours to reel in the gator, Naylor said.

That catch came after the four caught an 11-foot, 7-inch gator in the same bay. They battled that 375-pound monster for three hours starting late Tuesday and into early Wednesday morning.

GATORS IN THE NEWS

Florida man attacked by alligator while diving for golf balls

Watch as this giant gator stalks two cranes on a golf course

Facebook shows horse attacking gator in field near Gainesville

12-foot alligator catch follows an 11-footer caught the night before 08/18/17 [Last modified: Friday, August 18, 2017 12:27pm]
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