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Amy Scherzer's Diary

Amy Scherzer's Diary: Weekly Wrap-Up of the Tampa Social Scene

Fashion Funds the Cure

Tampa Bay Buc Gerald McCoy and pediatric cancer survivor Joshua Fisher flexed their biceps and the crowd went wild at the 14th annual Fashion Funds the Cure starring young models fighting cancer and a lively group of alumni happily recognized from previous National Pediatric Cancer Foundation's fashion shows. Former Gator quarterback and T he Bachelor contestant Jesse Palmer emceed as the kids escorted their career role models, like super cute Millie and Supermodel Kelly Gale and actress Carla Corvo. Anya Harvey, who wants to be Batman or a police officer with a cape, hit the runway with Hillsborough Sheriff Col. Chad Chronister. Dillard's dressed the kids in the latest spring styles which they got to keep.

Event chairs Chris Carrere, Jay Langford, Mike Levin and Alex Sullivan are pleased the event that started right here is now staged in six other cities. With 1,000 guests sampling from 18 restaurant stations in Port Tampa Bay Terminal 2, the May 6 benefit raised nearly half-million dollars for research.

Joshua House Foundation Circle of Friends Dinner

Nick and Edie Kavoulkis opened their south Tampa "hacienda" to more than 100 Friends of the Joshua House Foundation for a Cinco de Mayo fiesta. Five was the significant number at dinner May 5 — five courses, five colorful tables and at least five kinds of tequila cocktails.

"Five signifies harmony and balance," said chairwoman Jan Karamitsanis, exactly what the abused or abandoned children sheltered at Joshua House need. As the Mariachi Invasor band played and guests sat down to dinner, a brief downpour sent everyone scurrying to the porch and Mise en Place caterers out to cover the tables with plastic sheets. The rain soon stopped, the Mexican-inspired dinner resumed and $38,000 was raised for children's programs.

Sea Grapes Wine & Food Festival

Newly-hired Florida Aquarium CEO Roger Germann got a big Tampa welcome at the SeaGrapes Wine & Food Festival, making his debut at the debut of the new Mosaic Center, the just-opened ballroom and rooftop event space with wraparound watefront views of Garrison Channel. VIPs were the first to party up there; the rest of the 1,300 guests found a hundred wine varietals and restaurant buffets scattered among the exhibits, including Kona Grill, Mise en Place, Roy's, Texas de Brazil, Carmel Kitchen, Ciccio Cali and Fuzzy's Taco Shop. After seeing the conservation projects for staghorn coral, sand tiger sharks, sea turtles and other species, virtual swag bags "filled" with coupons is eco-smart and kept hands free for dancing to Bus Stop.

Children's Home Network anniversary lunch

The Children's Home, opened in 1892 as an orphanage, has a new name: the Children's Home Network, rebranded with the addition of innovative programs "to unlock the potential of at-risk children and families... based on respect, dignity and compassion," all values that luncheon guest speaker Regina Calcaterra and her four siblings missed when their single mother abandoned them. The co-author of Unbroken: A Sister's Harrowing Story of the Survival from the Streets of Long Island to the Farms of Idaho, shared the family history with 400-plus guests at the 125th anniversary luncheon May 11 at the DoubleTree Hotel.

Events

June 3: Leukemia & Lymphoma Society's Man & Woman of the Year Grand Finale Gala; 6 p.m.; Hilton Downtown Tampa; $200; mwoy.org/sun.

June 17: St. Joseph's Children's Hospital Foundation's Heroes Ball, 6:30 p.m.; Glazer Family JCC; $300; (813) 872-0979 or sjhfoundation.org/events.

July 22: 12th Martinis for Moffitt sponsored by Bay Area Advisors for Moffitt Cancer Center's Advanced Prostate Cancer Collaboration & the Adolescent and Young Adult Program; VIP reception, 6 p.m.; general admission, 7 p.m; Straz Center; $150 and up; Martinisfor

Moffitt.org.

Amy Scherzer's Diary: Weekly Wrap-Up of the Tampa Social Scene 05/17/17 [Last modified: Wednesday, May 17, 2017 7:12pm]
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