Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

48 police trainees killed in attack, Pakistani officials report

Pakistan

Dozens of police trainees killed during attack

Gunmen stormed a police training center late Monday in Pakistan's restive Baluchistan province and detonated explosive vests, killing at least 48 police trainees, authorities said. Baluchistan's top health official, Noorul Haq, said at least 116 people were wounded — mostly police trainees and some paramilitary troops. A security official put the death toll at 51. Major Gen. Sher Afgan, chief of the paramilitary Frontier Corps, told reporters today that the attackers appeared to be in contact with handlers in Afghanistan. He said the attackers belonged to the banned Lashker-e-Jhangvi Al-Almi group, an Islamic militant group affiliated with al-Qaida. Neither Lashker-a-Jhangvi nor any other group had claimed responsibility. Between four and six gunmen carried out the attack, officials said.

Sacramento, Calif.

Lawmakers enter fight over soldier bonuses

Members of Congress and veterans leaders on Monday called for federal action to absolve the debts of nearly 10,000 California soldiers who have been ordered by the Pentagon to repay enlistment bonuses a decade after they signed up to serve in Iraq and Afghanistan. Lawmakers from California expressed outrage, including Democratic Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer; House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, a Republican; and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat. Maj. Gen. Matthew Beevers said the California National Guard is working with members of Congress to introduce legislation that would order the National Guard Bureau to clear the debts of soldiers who were wrongly told they were eligible for bonuses of $15,000 or more.

Wiggins, Miss.: The president of the Mississippi NAACP is demanding a federal hate crime investigation after the parents of a black high school student said as many as four white students put a noose around their son's neck at Stone High School in Wiggins.

Palm Springs, Calif.: The owner and operator of the tour bus involved in the Desert Hot Springs crash that left 13 people dead on Sunday had been previously sued at least twice for negligence after collisions with vehicles, one of which ended in three deaths, court documents show.

Dallas: A nurse who contracted Ebola two years ago while caring for the first person to be diagnosed in the United States with the disease settled a suit Monday against the parent company of the Dallas hospital where she worked. Attorneys for Nina Pham announced the settlement; terms weren't disclosed.

Venezuela: As President Nicolas Maduro flew to Rome for a hastily arranged meeting with Pope Francis, representatives of Venezuela's government and a leader of the opposition agreed Monday to allow the Vatican to mediate a dialogue about solving the country's political crisis. The accord appeared to mark a pause in escalating tension, which intensified last week when the country's electoral council suspended the opposition's drive for a referendum to recall Maduro.

Times wires

48 police trainees killed in attack, Pakistani officials report 10/24/16 [Last modified: Monday, October 24, 2016 10:50pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. The winner of 'Survivor: Game Changers?' It has to be Jeff Probst

    Blogs

    But Tampa Bay fans are more interested in whether local lawyer and ex-Buccaneer Brad Culpepper came out on top. After winning five - count ‘em five - challenges Culpepper made probably the most serious error in taking Sarah Lacina. the 33-year-old police officer from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, to the finals with him.

  2. To catch a ring of poachers who targeted Florida's million-dollar alligator farming industry, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission set up an undercover operation. They created their own alligator farm, complete with plenty of real, live alligators, watched over by real, live undercover wildlife officers. It also had hidden video cameras to record everything that happened. That was two years ago, and on Wednesday wildlife officers announced that they arrested nine people on  44 felony charges alleging they broke wildlife laws governing alligator harvesting, transporting eggs and hatchlings across state lines, dealing in stolen property, falsifying records, racketeering and conspiracy. The wildlife commission released these photos of alligators, eggs and hatchlings taken during the undercover operation. [Courtesy of Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission]
  3. Trigaux: Amid a record turnout, regional technology group spotlights successes, desire to do more

    Business

    ST. PETERSBURG — They came. They saw. They celebrated Tampa Bay's tech momentum.

    A record turnout event by the Tampa Bay Technology Forum, held May 24 at the Mahaffey Theater in St. Petersburg, featured a panel of area tech executives talking about the challenges encountered during their respective mergers and acquisitions. Show, from left to right, are: Gerard Purcell, senior vice president of global IT integration at Tech Data Corp.; John Kuemmel, chief information officer at Triad Retail Media, and Chris Cate, chief operating officer at Valpak. [Robert Trigaux, Times]
  4. Take 2: Some fear Tampa Bay Next transportation plan is TBX redux

    Transportation

    TAMPA — For many, Wednesday's regional transportation meeting was a dose of deja vu.

    The Florida Department of Transportation on Monday announced that it was renaming its controversial Tampa Bay Express plan, also known as TBX. The plan will now be known as Tampa Bay Next, or TBN. But the plan remains the same: spend $60 billion to add 90 miles of toll roads to bay area interstates that are currently free of tolls. [Florida Department of Transportation]
  5. Hailed as 'pioneers,' students from St. Petersburg High's first IB class return 30 years later

    Education

    ST. PETERSBURG — The students came from all over Pinellas County, some enduring hot bus rides to a school far from home. At first, they barely knew what to call themselves. All they knew was that they were in for a challenge.

    Class of 1987 alumni Devin Brown, from left, and D.J. Wagner, world history teacher Samuel Davis and 1987 graduate Milford Chavous chat at their table.